• A Journey Into Contemporary Food and Education at The Field Museum

  • Blue Heron Café, Storage, Dining Rooms & Central Kitchen at Vicar’s Landing Continuing Care Retirement Community in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.

  • The Fresh Face of Corporate Dining

  • DSR of the Month, September 2014: Troy Little, Contract and Design Specialist Rapids Wholesale Equipment Co., Marion, Iowa

Foodservice News

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jCarbonara
Joe Carbonara

Meaningful Value: Innovation and Information Sharing

W hen the economy tanked seven years ago, innovation became the panacea that was going to cure everyone's fiscal ills. Business leaders and politicians tripped over each other in a race to the microphone to let everyone know they were ready to lead the charge toward innovation, which ultimately would spark the economic growth the U.S. so desperately needed to break free from its economic tailspin.

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jMartinez
Juan Martinez

Designing for Flexibility: How Much Can You Afford Not to Do?

Many factors come into play when designing a restaurant. The décor and ambience represent obvious considerations but one design element many concepts fail to consider is building flexibility into the front-of-house, middle-of-house and back-of-house designs.

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jStiegler
Jerry Stiegler

Burger King Gets Heat for Proposed Move while McDonald’s Feels the Crunch Despite Positive Advance Sales Reports for August

This Week In Foodservice looks at good sales numbers in August from both the government and Knapp Track, provides a look at a Federal Reserve study on why the economy is so soft, and covers a bunch of news on both McDonald’s and Burger King as well as a whole lot more.

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Greg Christian
Greg Christian

Outcomes for Year One of a New, Self-Op School Lunch Program

As the 2014-2015 school year draws to a close, I'd like to share the final outcomes of Nardin Academy's new self-operated foodservice program.

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Highlights

FCSI Panel LEEDs the Discussion on the Greening of Foodservice

A veteran foodservice design consultant shares three keys to achieving LEED status for a design project.

The greening of foodservice operations remains top of mind for most every member of the industry. Generally speaking, most every foodservice operator is in favor of making their business more environmentally friendly but the key is balancing the extra costs associated with going green with the return such steps can provide. In other words, everyone is in favor of helping the environment right up to the point when they have to pay for it.

So it was with great interest that I attended a FCSI-sponsored LEED panel discussion that took place on the eve of The NAFEM Show. The room was swollen with consultant and allied members of FCSI, which leaves me believing that the many people throughout the industry are continuing to come to grips with what it actually means to be green in a foodservice sense.

Moderator Richard Eisenbarth of Cini Little, an international design consulting firm, shared his experiences on what it takes to get a foodservice project LEED certified by the U.S. Green Building Council. All foodservice-related LEED projects share three common traits, he said, including:

An Owner Committed to Pursuing LEED Certification: Because some of the more energy-efficient pieces of equipment tend to cost more than other items, the price of pursuing LEED certification can be higher than other foodservice projects. As a result, if the owner is not committed to pursuing LEED, the project runs the risk of having the energy-efficient items value-engineered out in order to cut up front costs.

Know Your Baseline: It is important to understand the starting point for energy consumption, water use and other environmental factors and be able to show the ways the project improves upon these levels. Expanding on this point, later in the presentation Bill Clark of Manitowoc Foodservice, said that the typical foodservice operation's energy consumption breaks down something like this: 13 percent to lighting, 6 percent to refrigeration, 18 percent to sanitation, 35 percent to food preparation and 28 percent on HVAC.

No One Piece of Equipment will Result in Earning a LEED Point: Specifying energy-efficient products, including those with Energy Star ratings, can help a foodservice project eventually accumulate LEED points but no specific piece of equipment will generate a LEED point on its own, Eisenbarth said. It is important to know the innovative aspects of a foodservice design and be able to quantify that when pursuing LEED. For example, low-volume exhaust hoods can be very helpful when pursuing LEED. But it is important to quantify the actual savings these items represent.

Clearly, there's a lot more to cover with LEED and the overall greening of foodservice. So in my next post, I will share a few other thoughts from this panel based on the presentation of Todd Taylor, director of design for Darden Restaurants.
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