• Renovation Rejuvenation: Successful Restaurant Transformations

  • Salamander Resort & Spa in Middleburg, Va.

  • Michael Hanson,Sales Specialist Bintz Restaurant Supply, Salt Lake City

Foodservice News

Read more Foodservice News

Blog Network

Joe Carbonara

Serve the Industry Well

The foodservice industry seems stuck in a rut. 


Juan Martinez

Is the Minimum Wage Good for Your Business?

How can foodservice operators address rising labor costs? Consultant Juan Martinez offers some food for thought. Read more...

Jerry Stiegler

Extent of Fast Food Worker Strike Unclear, More Americans Going Out For Turkey and More

What really happened during the recent restaurant “strike?” One in ten Americans will eat their Thanksgiving dinner in a restaurant. Food-away-from-home prices continue to increase faster than grocery store prices. Consumers still aren’t in a mood to spend. These stories and whole lot more This Week In Foodservice.



How to Specify a Food Processor

Because there are varying types of food processors, operators need to become familiar with the different capabilities and uses. There are many considerations when specifying these units.

Here are four considerations foodservice operators and their supply chain partners should weigh when specifying the correct unit.

Type of Unit: Determine how the foodservice staff will use the food processor. For example, cutter-mixers are suitable for purees, mixing, chopping, blending and dough kneading. It is also important to consider units that accommodate different bowl sizes can provide added flexibility.

Size and Horsepower: Food type will determine the horsepower, bowl size and attachments needed. Dense products, such as cheese and meat, require a higher horsepower motor. High-volume operations also should consider units with larger bowls, more horsepower and extra feed chutes, which can help reduce prep time and increase efficiency.

Blade Type: The type of product being prepared also dictates the blade used. Different blades produce different cuts. The more dense the product, the thicker the blade should be. Fine blades should not be used for dense products, as bending or further damage can occur.

Cleaning: For easier cleaning and enhanced food safety, it is best to choose food processors with minimal nooks and crannies that can trap food and harbor harmful bacteria. Easy to remove attachments facilitate quick cleaning and better sanitation.

Safety Features: Ensure that the food processor provides safety features, such as guards and switches that turn the unit off automatically at appropriate times. This is especially important in kitchens with inexperienced cooks.

Related Articles